Contact us at lizann@fitnessasalifestyle.com
Contact us at lizann@fitnessasalifestyle.com

What is HIIT?

What is High Interval Intense Training?

No Rest for your Metabolism

HIIT stands for High Intense Interval Training allowing clients to accomplish a higher quality workout in 30 minutes than they traditionally receive from a 60+ minute workout.

A 1996 study from Baylor College of Medicine (Houston, TX) reported that subjects who followed a HIIT workout on a stationary cycle burned significantly more calories during the 24 hours following the workout than those who cycled at a moderate steady-state intensity.

LOSE 100 MORE CALORIES

In a study presented at the 2007 annual meeting of the American College of Sports Medicine by Florida State University (Tallahassee), researchers reported that subjects who performed HIIT burned almost 10 percent more calories during the 24 hours following exercise as compared to those who performed continuous steady-state exercise, despite the fact that the total calories burned during the workouts were the same. In addition to the increase in resting metabolism, research confirms that HIIT is effective at enhancing the metabolic machinery in muscle cells that promote fat burning and blunt fat production:

Fat Burning Muscle

The Laval University study that found a decrease in body fat with HIIT workouts and also discovered that the HIIT subjects’ muscle fibers had significantly higher markers for fat oxidation (fat burning) than those in the continuous steady-state exercise group.

DECREASE YOUR FAT ENZYMES

A study from the Norwegian University of Science and Technology (Trondheim), reported that subjects with metabolic syndrome who followed a 16-week HIIT program had a 100 percent greater decrease in content of the fat-producing enzyme fatty acid syntheses as compared to subjects who followed continuous moderate-intensity exercise.  This goes to show that HIIT appears to work and allows the fat to be burned away for good.

Is HIIT Right for You?

Who would benefit most from a HIIT regimen?

Someone looking to burn as much fat as possible during a cutting phase, someone looking to minimize fat gain during a bulking phase, or someone looking to increase aerobic and anaerobic endurance significantly would all benefit greatly from a HIIT regimen. Athletes who participate in a sport where the intensity varies constantly will benefit greatly as well. HIIT simulates a sport like basketball or soccer very well in that low to moderate intensity is constantly alternated with high intensity.

Faster Results. Less Time

What kind of results can you expect from HIIT?

HIIT will accomplish two goals: it will help accelerate fat loss and improve aerobic and anaerobic endurance. HIIT will most likely produce very fast results in a short period of time which is why it has been gaining popularity ever since it was introduced to the bodybuilding community. No one can promise specific measurable results, but it is feasible that after an 8-week cycle of HIIT combined with weight training, clients and those around them will be able to notice a significant change to their bodies. Athletes will be able to perform better in their given sport and will outperform others toward the end of games when everyone else is getting tired.

HIIT it Right

To prevent injury, start HIIT sessions with a good warm-up and end them with a proper cool-down. Also, because participants are going to burn an incredible amount of calories in a short time span, staying constantly hydrated is key to avoid cramping. Participants should drink lots of water before, during and after the session.

Resources

Boutcher, S. H. et al. The effect of high intensity intermittent exercise training on autonomic response of premenopausal women. Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise 39(5 suppl):S165, 2007.

Gorostiaga, E. M., et al. Uniqueness of interval and continuous training at the same maintained exercise intensity. European Journal of Applied Physiology 63(2):101-107, 1991.

King, J. W. A comparison of the effects of interval training vs. continuous training on weight loss and body composition in obese pre-menopausal women (thesis). East Tennessee State University, 2001.

Meuret, J. R., et al. A comparison of the effects of continuous aerobic, intermittent aerobic, and resistance exercise on resting metabolic rate at 12 and 21 hours post-exercise. Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise 39(5 suppl):S247, 2007.

Paton, C. D., et al. Effects of low- vs. high-cadence interval training on cycling performance. Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research 23(6): 1758-1763, 2009.

Smith, A. E., et al. Effects of B-alanine supplementation and high-intensity interval training on endurance performance and body composition in men; a double-blind trial. Journal of the International Society of Sports Nutrition 6:5, 2009.

Talanian, J. L., et al. Exercise training increases sarcolemmal and mitochondrial fatty acid transport proteins in human skeletal muscle. Am J Physiol Endocrinol Metab IN press, 2010.

Talanian, J. L., et al. Two weeks of high-intensity aerobic interval training increases the capacity for fat oxidation during exercise in women. Journal of Applied Physiology 102(4):1439-1447, 2007.

Tjonna, A. E., et al. Superior cardiovascular effect of interval training versus moderate exercise in patients with metabolic syndrome. Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise 39(5 suppl):S112, 2007.

Trapp, E. G. and Boutcher, S. Metabolic response of trained and untrained women during high-intensity intermittent cycle exercise. Am J Physiol Regul Integr Comp Physiol. 2007 Dec; 293(6):R2370-5.

Treuth, M. S., et al. Effects of exercise intensity on 24-h energy expenditure and substrate oxidation. Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise 28(9):1138-1143, 1996.